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It is Monday night, and the wonderful pet with whom we were prepared to bid farewell is an entirely different creature than the one from last Wednesday through Friday.

When we brought her home Friday afternoon, both Jose and I assumed we would be spending our last few moments with Flyer; however, she decided to call her own shots! And call them, she did.

Friday evening, I pulled her in a wagon, supplied by the Salchak Family, over to watch Jose in the traditional home-game “step-off” when the marching band leaves the high school and marches the several block up Delaine to the football stadium. As we neared the corner of the band room, a musician blew on his horn, and Flyer’s ears perked up. Before I knew it, Flyer had jumped out of the wagon and was rolling on the grass!

We rounded the corner and eventually Flyer spied Jose coming over to us.

Friday night I gave Flyer an insulin shot, and she was fantastic – not a sign of even feeling it.

Saturday morning she seemed to be even more herself, and the improvement continued throughout the day. The Carter family, and Joanie & Brian Pollock came over at separate times, and they could not believe this was the same dog who seemed near death on Wednesday.

All day Sunday, Flyer continued to improve, and her appetite grew even stronger.

Sunday and Monday, as I rearranged and cleaned the basement, Flyer followed me up and down the stairs numerous times, as well as from room to room – just like pre-illness Flyer.

Over on the front lawn of the high school she has even trotted a hundred feet or so, and was delighted to be chasing, and then chewing sticks.

The boniness that suddenly overtook her body last week is now rounded out with more flesh, and she once again looks healthy.

Flyer is still in critical condition as the pancreatitis clears up, and hopefully this will cure the diabetes which has been out of control.

Jose and I so appreciate the tremendous support and love our family has received the past several days – the prayers, the emails, the Facebook support, the visits, and the phone calls. What a wonderful group of people we have surrounding us!

Thank you!

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Photos of Flyer the past several years…

There may be some hope!

Conversation with Dr. Adam, from Far Hills Animal Clinic, Thursday morning, 8:30am:

  • Acute pancreatitis
    • Amylase (twice normal)
    • lipase (greater than a 1000 – system was not calibrated to read higher)
    • if pancreatitis is healed, then blood sugar may not be an issue
    • will be difficult to cure with uterine infection
  • would like to start treatment to stabilize her pancreas and hypoglycemia
  • however, she may flounder with treatments since she is so ill
  • Dr. Adam suggested aggressive treatment where she would be hospitalized $$
    • IV
    • catheter
    • hospitalization would be $250-350 per day
    • later surgery for spay
  • A conservative treatment – which worries him due to her high counts – would be as an outpatient
    • blood sugar check
    • antibiotic fluid under the skin
    • around $150 per day for outpatient treatment
  • Dr. Adam doesn’t think she will pull through without the aggressive treatment

This is what I know so far, I told Dr. Adam I would call him back around 11:00am to let him know.

Thank you, to everyone, for the prayers, visits, emails, etc.!!!

Darin

This was well said – finally, someone has presented the facts… Mr. Olberman also stated what I have been listing for weeks – the other Christian parishes immediately ON Ground Zero!!!

I think I passed three of the most enjoyable days of my summer!

Thursday morning, I had a two hour lesson with one of my graduated seniors, Ryan Crouch, and as always, it was a great time – and tons of laughter.

Shortly after Ryan departed, Mother arrived from Indiana. She took two days off work from the police department to come see Jose’s band show a the end of band camp. She and I went to Mongolian Grill, and after a brief rest at home, we headed out to Wright State University where the Fairmont marching band has practiced all week.

We enjoyed the pre-game presentation, and especially the first completed movement of the 2010 competition. The percussion ensemble also played their feature which was already sounding great.

At the end of camp, two of my former students, Torrey Cowan and Chris Taylor, arrived. Chris’ apartment is just across from where our band practiced. Torrey was one of my field commanders, and served Springboro High School’s marching band last year, and did a superb job. I met the Taylor family in 1999 when Chris was eight years old. His older brother, Joe, and his older sister, Rebecca, were also piano students. Joe went on to play trumpet for SHS, and Rebecca began on flute, and switched to French horn her junior year – doing a remarkable job. Chris started on piano, and in fifth grade, at age 10, started saxophone lessons. By the end of his freshman year we were working hard on field commander preparations. Chris served as the saxophone section leader, and as field commander throughout his high school career. So, I had the Taylor family for ten years in lessons. Rebecca is working on her masters at WSU, Joe just graduated from WSU, and Chris will be a sophomore this fall at WSU.

It was so great to see these two former students.

After leaving camp, we had a traditional post-camp supper, this year at Steak N Shake.

Friday morning I prepared an egg casserole, and pancakes, and we enjoyed a great breakfast out on the deck where, for the first time in weeks, it was actually comfortable!

At 2:00pm Jose had his upper wisdom teeth removed. He was a brave little soldier, and handled it just fine. In fact, he is still doing fine, having bounced back with no problems.

We got Jose’s prescription for his pain medication (he has only taken one pill as of Saturday morning), and returned home where I prepared a spaghetti & meat balls dinner in the crock pot.

Mother and I drove to the beautiful Smith Gardens of Oakwood. We met my wonderful neighbor lady, Kay, who walked with us through the very beautiful grounds. While we were chatting, we saw a judge enter the garden, followed by a bride and groom, and two witnesses. At first I thought they were looking for a location to shoot some photos, however, I learned that they were actually performing the very private ceremony there. I offered to take photos for them throughout the ceremony, and several after. It was really great to be a part of their cherished moments, even if they were complete strangers.

We left the gardens, and bid farewell to Kay who was off to a birthday party.

Mother and I drove through Oakwood, down past Carillon Park and Old River Park – I even drove her to the former NCR headquarters so she could see the lagoon where Jose and I often canoe. We then headed to Big Lots for some odds and ends. While there, the executive director from ACTION Adoption Services contacted me to see if I could come in to teach the pre-adoptive class since the scheduled trainer was held up at work. I agreed to do it, and Mother went with me.

It was fun having Mother in on this class, which was about “Discipline,” as Mother participated, and shared some of her own parenting experiences, especially supplementing the fact that each child is very different, and not every child can be parented the same, exact way. It was a fun evening.

We arrived home, and had a bowl of spaghetti out on the deck.

This morning it was English muffins, cereal, sugar-free angel food cake with strawberries (what we would have eaten for desert had I not taught class), and coffee.

Sophie Lockhart arrived for her saxophone and voice lesson, and Mother really enjoyed getting to hear Sophie play. We also got to chat with Mike Lockhart for a few minutes.

After the Lockharts left, Mother returned to Indiana. Jose and I are now plotting the rest of our day.

This was just a super, super few days, and what a way to springboard into Beavercreek High School’s show choir for which I will be teaching this week.

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This weekend I discovered I had several text messages I had not checked. I have a cell phone but I am not as dependent on it as the rest of the world is. The text messages were from one of the neatest former students, Marlyn Strickland, a 2009 graduate of Beavercreek High School.

Marlyn, ready to enter his sophomore year at The Ohio State University, majoring in music education, sent this text on July 17th:

“Hey Darin! I was just curious how busy you would be on August 2nd. The corps I’m marching in is coming to Centerville’s show. It’d be awesome if you could come.”

July 30th, he sent a second text asking if I could come see him at Soaring Sounds in Centerville.

Sunday, I found his message and responded that I would make it out there to see him, and by golly I did.

Marlyn Strickland - a sweaty Scout

Maryln is marching with The Madison Scouts Drum & Bugle Corps this summer. During the fall he is one of those marching buckeyes at OSU – and since Fairmont’s marching band will be heading to OSU this fall for a competition, I will get to see Marlyn perform with OSU.

When the Madison Scouts finished performing – to a rousing burst of excitement from the audience – I found Marlyn’s family by the Elk bell tower. It was great getting to see Linda and Mark, his parents, and to meet his grandparents, sisters, and other family members. As the Scouts passed by from their post show meeting, Marlyn approached, and as a former teacher, it is always great when your kids get those big excited smiles when they see me.

Marlyn came to me his junior year to study voice, piano, and music theory. We also covered conducting, arranging, and basic teaching concepts. Within a few months, Marlyn was quite skilled at arranging and had several pieces performed. In fact, one arrangement was performed by a college band! Marlyn’s one hour lesson was seldom under ninety minutes each week. We were always absorbed in the material being covered, and always had a great time working together.

August 2009, Marlyn was one of 24 students to leave the studio. 23 of the students were heading off to college to major in music education or performance, or musical theatre. Although there were 24 students, there 41 lessons leaving as many had doubled on piano/theory to prepare for college. I love all my students but Marlyn was that one exceptional young man that was already on the wave length as most college sophomores.

I am confident he will be a sensation in music education, arranging, and anything else he pursues in music.

Marlyn, I am so proud of you!

Marlyn with his parents and sister

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